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Vienna, II

August 17, 2011

It has occurred to me that I haven’t dated these things, so maybe we can do better in that respect going forward.

I must now sing a verse from the bloggers’ lament, which is to apologize for not posting in a timely manner. I would read this or some variant thereof on other blogs, and think, OK, no material, or too busy, or whatever. Now I know the truth, which is that this is, to a great extent, not fun but work, and I am to a great extent lazy. And now I’m way behind, so here goes.

Saturday, 8/13

The Ringstrasse is a street, or series of streets, that encircle the inner city, and on Saturday we walked around the right half, and took pics of a few points of interest.

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This is the Musikverein, although the name on the front is the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Association of Friends of Music). It’s the home of the Vienna Philharmonic.

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Here’s the musicains’ entrance, around to the left.

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Further around the Ring is the Stadtpark (City Park), with statues and monuments of famous Viennese musicians, including Johann Strauss. This is actually a replica, filling in while the real one is being refurbished.

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The Kursalon, opened by the Strauss brothers, is at the back of the park.

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Me and Franz Schubert.

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New and old Vienna. At the right is Urania, Franz Joseph’s observatory, and just across the Danube canal, below, are tons of new buildings.

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The beautiful brown Danube. (it was never blue, Strauss notwithstanding.) This is actually a canal, not the Danube proper, but it marks the dividing line between the inner city, with its period turn-of-the-century architecture, and the contemporary constructions of steel and glass on the other side.

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The Secession Building, home to the group of artists of that name founded by Gustav Klimt, whose Beethoven Frieze is located inside. It was closed by the time we stumbled upon it, but we intend to get back to it later. The Secession artists were part of a larger art movement, the Jugendstil, which was the Austrian counterpart to Art Nouveau, and the building is decorated in that style.

And so, home. Church tomorrow!

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